The Liechtenstein Oberland

Coat of arms of Planken, Liechtenstein. Click here for information about the villageThe 'Oberland' is the old county of Vaduz, and encompasses the villages in the south of the country. The northernmost village is Planken, perched on the mountain ledge under the Drei Schwestern (three sisters) mountain, with wonderful views across the Rhine valley to Switzerland, and on clear days, down the Rhine to Lake Constance (the 'Bodensee').

 

Coat of arms of Schaan, Liechtenstein. Click here for information about the villageSchaan is the largest village in the country, and occupies one of the main transport nodes, having the main railway station in Liechtenstein, and hosting the main post-bus interchange.

 

Coat of arms of Vaduz, Liechtenstein. Click here for information about the villageMoving south, you enter the capital of the Oberland, and the modern country of Liechtenstein - Vaduz. As you enter the village, you see the dominant castle overlooking the village. Most of the centre is pedestrianised, and it is possible to walk up to the castle, although it is not open to the public as the royal family are in permanent residence.

 

Coat of arms of Triesen, Liechtenstein. Click here for information about the village Coat of arms of Triesenberg, Liechtenstein. Click here for information about the villageFurther south lies the village of Triesen, straddling the valley floor and foot of the mountains, and the route up to Triesenberg which lies about 500 metres above it on the mountain side. The views from Triesenberg are spectacular, and they get better the higher one travels. On this road, you can reach the unique Walser settlement of Steg, and further on, Liechtenstein's ski resort of Malbun.

 

Coat of arms of Balzers, Liechtenstein. Click here for information about the villageIn the southern corner of the country lies Balzers, dominated by its own castle - the castle of Gutenberg. This was a highly strategic point in years gone-by as it occupies the eastern bank of the Rhine as it swings north. A pass to the north-east also allows access to Zurich, so this has been much sought after over the centuries.